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Sunday, February 26, 2017

Fwd: Monday's poet is Afaa Michael Weaver

The Poetry Show, February 27, 2016

7:30 - 9:00 AM EST on EPIC Radio.

This week's featured poet: Afaa Michael Weaver

Here is our player link.


Afaa Michael Weaver was born in 1951 in Baltimore, MD, the oldest of five children of working class parents. His mother was a beautician and his father was steelworker. He graduated from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, an elite high school, at age 16, and then enrolled in the University of Maryland. After two years he dropped out of college, married, and for the next fifteen years worked in series of manufacturing jobs. However, during those years he continued to write poetry and launched a small publishing company (7th Son Press) and a literary journal (Blind Alley) with his overtime earnings and a grant from the city of Baltimore. In 1985, he published his first book of poetry, Water Song (University Press of Virginia, 1985). In that same year he also won a $20,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and a fellowship
to the graduate creative writing program at Brown University. The fellowship was contingent on finishing his undergraduate degree, which he did at Excelsior College. Subsequent books include My Father's Geography (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1992), Timber and Prayer (University of Pittsburgh Press, 1995), Ten Lights of God (Bucknell University Press, 2000), Multitudes (Saraband Books, 2000), and the three books that form the Plum Flower Dance trilogy: Plum Flower Dance: Poems 1985-2005 (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2007), The Government of Nature (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2013) which won the prestigious Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award, and City of Eternal Spring (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014). His two most recent publications are the chapbook A Hard Summation (Central Square Press, 2014), a cycle of thirteen poems about African-American history from the slavery to the current day, and the full length collection, Spirit Boxing (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017), which centers on the years he spent working in factories. In 2002, he won a Fulbright scholarship, went to Taiwan, and taught at National Taiwan University and Taipei National University of the Arts. He currently teaches at Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts.

This week's featured poem is "A Nation of Hands," from his just published collection, Spirit Boxing (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017). This poem begins as a descriptive list of actions undertaken by hands but takes a surprising turn toward the end. 

A NATION OF HANDS

Kneading dough on rough wooden tables, forward
and backward, in laundry tubs with scrubbing boards,
sweat sifting down temples where hair lays sweetened
in curls, on the chests of arrested hearts, pushing down,
praying the heart headed to the dust will stop and know
the troubling grief it is about to summon, children's
hands moving across blackboards to erase a day's study
and please the teachers, on sacred books above gestures
signifying which way to turn, parades of hopeful souls
headed to righteousness in churches, temples, mosques,
over the terrified mouths of men on decks of ships
overwhelmed, about to founder full of fresh haddock,
massaging the stiffened backs of our grandfathers, lifting
memories of our origins out of sheaths of muscle tissue,
holding a frightened calf down to hush it to sleep,
sucking back tears to think of tables it will feed, deciding
in one last minute to let it go and eat vegetables instead,
that mercy, or the mercy of walking in the full breeze
of spring in Appalachia, your dress lifting under you,
singing the surprise of love when it is full and bright,
the applause held in suspended air when the dance
surprises, the music lifts to some impossible phrase,
those mercies and the deep mercy of knowing hands
are the openers of gates and clasped they are the keys.





--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

Saturday, February 25, 2017

The Poets And Mechanics Friends Worship Group -- 26 February 2017

The Poets And Mechanics Friends Worship Group -- 26 February 2017

Friends: We meet for worship in the tradition and testimonies of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in the second floor reading room of the Four Seasons Bookstore, 114 W German St, Shepherdstown, WV, 8:30 AM.

The bookstore is not open at 8:30, so, enter the "private entrance" gate immediately to the left of the store and walk back to the staircase. Enter the landing closest to the front of the store -- that's the EPIC Radio Studio. Go thru the kitchen into the reading room.

If you have a harmonious spirit, feeling or personal witness towards the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community,  equality and stewardship, and the Light of the Divine in each life, or simply a curiosity -- Welcome!




Query: Where To Walk? Toward, With, or Away from, the Refugee?

Practice: How to hold someone in the Light: Anna Lee via Levon Helm


A Poem for Reflection on 26 February 2017: 

The first paragraph of the first page, of Moby Dick, by Herman Melville, a parable of the struggle between human destiny, and human, and God's, nature.

"Call me Ishmael. Some years ago - never mind how long precisely - having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen, and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every funeral I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people's hats off - then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can. This is my substitute for pistol and ball. With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship."

--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

The Poets And Mechanics Friends Worship Group -- 26 February 2017

Friends: We meet for worship in the tradition and testimonies of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in the second floor reading room of the Four Seasons Bookstore, 114 W German St, Shepherdstown, WV, 8:30 AM.

The bookstore is not open at 8:30, so, enter the "private entrance" gate immediately to the left of the store and walk back to the staircase. Enter the landing closest to the front of the store -- that's the EPIC Radio Studio. Go thru the kitchen into the reading room.

If you have a harmonious spirit, feeling or personal witness towards the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community,  equality and stewardship, and the Light of the Divine in each life, or simply a curiosity -- Welcome!




Query: Where To Walk? Toward, With, or Away from, the Refugee?

Practice: How to hold someone in the Light: Anna Lee via Levon Helm


A Poem for Reflection on 26 February 2017: 

The first paragraph of the first page, of Moby Dick, by Herman Melville, a parable of the struggle between human destiny, and human, and God's, nature.

“Call me Ishmael. Some years ago - never mind how long precisely - having little or no money in my purse, and nothing particular to interest me on shore, I thought I would sail about a little and see the watery part of the world. It is a way I have of driving off the spleen, and regulating the circulation. Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every funeral I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people's hats off - then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can. This is my substitute for pistol and ball. With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship.”




Sunday, February 19, 2017

Eastern Panhandle Independent Community (EPIC) Radio:Fwd: Monday's poet is Eva Saulitis

John Case has sent you a link to a blog:



Blog: Eastern Panhandle Independent Community (EPIC) Radio
Post: Fwd: Monday's poet is Eva Saulitis
Link: http://www.enlightenradio.org/2017/02/fwd-mondays-poet-is-eva-saulitis.html

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Quaker Radio, the Partially Examined Life, and Richard Diamond, Private EYE -- Sunday on EPIC Radio


Quaker Radio, the Partially Examined Life, and Richard Diamond, Private EYE -- Sunday on EPIC Radio

Quaker Radio features a famous sermon by Dr William Barber, a classic address by Dr. Paul Tillich, and a reprise of Liberation Theology podcasts.

The Partially Examined Life addresses Philosophical problems in Left Wing politics. This American Life revisits the idea of revolution.


Following deep thought and religion, Richard Diamond, Private Eye -- returns with classic old time radio mysteries.
--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Poets and Mechanics Meeting for Worship

The Poets and Mechanics Meeting for Worship -- 19 February 2017

Friends: We meet for worship in the tradition and testimonies of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in the second floor reading room of the Four Seasons Bookstore, 114 W German St, Shepherdstown, WV, 8:30 AM.

The bookstore is not open at 8:30, so, enter the "private entrance" gate immediately to the left of the store and walk back to the staircase. Enter the landing closest to the front of the store -- that's the EPIC Radio Studio. Go thru the kitchen into the reading room.

If you have a harmonious spirit, feeling or personal witness towards the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community,  equality and stewardship, and the Light of the Divine in each life, or simply a curiosity -- Welcome!


A Poem for Reflection on 19 February 2017


Beginning with 1914

Related Poem Content Details

Since it always begins
in the unlikeliest place
we start in an obsolete country
on no current map. The camera
glides over flower beds,
for this is a southern climate.
We focus on medals, a horse,
on a white uniform,
for this is June. The young man
waves to the people lining the road,
he lifts a child, he catches
a rose from a wrinkled woman
in a blue kerchief. Then we hear shots
and close in on a casket
draped in the Austrian flag.
Thirty-one days torn off a calendar.
Bombs on Belgrade; then Europe explodes.
We watch the trenches fill with men,
the air with live ammunition.
A close-up of a five-year-old
living on turnips. Her older sister,
my not-yet-mother, already
wearing my daughter's eyes,
is reading a letter as we cut
to a young man with thick glasses
who lies in a trench and writes
a study of Ibsen. I recognize him,
he is going to be my father,
and this is his way of keeping alive.
Snow. Blood. Lice. Frostbite.
Grenades. Stretchers. Coffins. Snow.
Telegrams with black borders.
On the wide screen my father returns
bringing his brother's body;
my mother's father brings back his son's
from the opposite edge. They come together
under the oaks of the cemetery.
All who will be my family
are here, except my sister,
who is not yet imagined.
Neither am I, who imagine
this picture, who now jump
to my snowy birthday in the year
of the million-mark loaf of bread.
My early years are played
by a blue-eyed child who grows up
quickly, for this is a film
of highlights, like all documentaries
false to the life—the work
 of selective memory, all I can bear
of a painful childhood. The swastika
appears and remains as the huge
backdrop against which we're seen.
The sound track of a hysterical voice
is threatening us. We're heard as whispers.
Shortly before my city
bursts into flames, my stand-in
disappears from the film, which continues
with scenes of terror and death
I can't bear to watch. I pick up
a new reel, a strange sequel
set in a different location
and made in another language,
in which I am back. The colors are bright,
the sound track is filled with music,
the focus gentle. A man is beside me.
Time-lapse photography picks up
the inchmeal growth of daughters
toward the sky, the slow subversion
of dark by gray hair. Little happens.
The camera sums up the even flow
of many years in a shot of a river.
The principals from part one
are missing, except for me
who am the connection. The time is now,
and I am playing myself.

--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

The Poets and Mechanics Meeting for Worship -- 19 February 2017

Friends: We meet for worship in the tradition and testimonies of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in the second floor reading room of the Four Seasons Bookstore, 114 German St, Shepherdstown, WV, 8:30 AM.

The bookstore is not open at 8:30, so, enter the "private entrance" gate immediately to the left of the store and walk back to the staircase. Enter the landing closest to the front of the store -- that's the EPIC Radio Studio. Go thru the kitchen into the reading room.

If you have a harmonious spirit, feeling or personal witness towards the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community,  equality and stewardship, and the Light of the Divine in each life, or simply a curiosity -- Welcome!


A Poem for Reflection on 19 February 2017


Beginning with 1914

Related Poem Content Details

Since it always begins
in the unlikeliest place
we start in an obsolete country
on no current map. The camera
glides over flower beds,
for this is a southern climate.
We focus on medals, a horse,
on a white uniform,
for this is June. The young man
waves to the people lining the road,
he lifts a child, he catches
a rose from a wrinkled woman
in a blue kerchief. Then we hear shots
and close in on a casket
draped in the Austrian flag.
Thirty-one days torn off a calendar.
Bombs on Belgrade; then Europe explodes.
We watch the trenches fill with men,
the air with live ammunition.
A close-up of a five-year-old
living on turnips. Her older sister,
my not-yet-mother, already
wearing my daughter’s eyes,
is reading a letter as we cut
to a young man with thick glasses
who lies in a trench and writes
a study of Ibsen. I recognize him,
he is going to be my father,
and this is his way of keeping alive.
Snow. Blood. Lice. Frostbite.
Grenades. Stretchers. Coffins. Snow.
Telegrams with black borders.
On the wide screen my father returns
bringing his brother’s body;
my mother’s father brings back his son’s
from the opposite edge. They come together
under the oaks of the cemetery.
All who will be my family
are here, except my sister,
who is not yet imagined.
Neither am I, who imagine
this picture, who now jump
to my snowy birthday in the year
of the million-mark loaf of bread.
My early years are played
by a blue-eyed child who grows up
quickly, for this is a film
of highlights, like all documentaries
false to the life—the work
 of selective memory, all I can bear
of a painful childhood. The swastika
appears and remains as the huge
backdrop against which we’re seen.
The sound track of a hysterical voice
is threatening us. We’re heard as whispers.
Shortly before my city
bursts into flames, my stand-in
disappears from the film, which continues
with scenes of terror and death
I can’t bear to watch. I pick up
a new reel, a strange sequel
set in a different location
and made in another language,
in which I am back. The colors are bright,
the sound track is filled with music,
the focus gentle. A man is beside me.
Time-lapse photography picks up
the inchmeal growth of daughters
toward the sky, the slow subversion
of dark by gray hair. Little happens.
The camera sums up the even flow
of many years in a shot of a river.
The principals from part one
are missing, except for me
who am the connection. The time is now,
and I am playing myself.


Tuesday, February 14, 2017

EPIC Radio Podcasts: Janet Harrison features Jake Adam York on the Poet...

EPIC Radio Podcasts: Janet Harrison features Jake Adam York on the Poet...: This Podcast was broadcast Monday, February 13, 2017, 7:30 - 9:00 AM, on EPIC Radio, from Shepherdstown, West Virginia. The featured poet i...

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Poetry and Literature on Monday on EPIC Radio

Poetry and Literature on Monday on EPIC Radio

EPIC Radio --Monday, February 13, 2017 -- Highlights







 




Here is our call-in Line: 304-885-0708


1. 7:30 -- 9:00 AM: The Poetry Show -- with Janet Harrison.





2. Noon to 1:00 PM Storytelling with Fanny Crawford




3. 1:15 PM - Literature Day on EPIC

  • The Art of War by Sun Tzu -- a classic text on conflict
  • The Call of the Wild, by Jack London -- The quintessential novel of the American wilderness.
  • Short Mysteries from Free library.

4. All Night: Bluegrass





The February 13, 2017 Playlists

Art of War (times relative to 1:15 PM)




Time
Artist
Title
00:00:00Sun Tzu1 Laying Plans - 2 Waging War
00:08:20Mike DieselVoice 015 -- Station ID
00:08:50Sun Tzu3 Attack By Stratagem - 4 Tactical Dispositions
00:16:27MIke DieselVoice 018 -- Staion ID
00:16:45Sun Tzu5 Energy - 6 Weak Points and Strong
00:27:13Sun Tzu7 Maneuvering - 8 Variation in Tactics
00:35:56Sun Tzu9 The Army on the March - 10 Terrain
00:50:29Sun Tzu11 The Nine Situations
01:03:17Mike DieselVoice 015 -- Station ID
01:03:47Sun Tzu12 The Attack By Fire - 13 The Use of Spies
01:12:38Mike DieselVoice 015 -- Station ID


The Call of the Wild (relative to 2:25 PM)



Time
Artist
Title
00:00:00Jack LondonChapter 1
00:24:02Mike DieselVoice 007 -- get some
00:24:13Jack LondonChapter 2
00:46:34Jack LondonChapter 3
01:15:18Mike DieselVoice 014 -- Station ID
01:15:42Jack LondonChapter 4
01:32:48Jack LondonChapters 5 and 6
02:34:24Mike DieselVoice 009 - station ID
02:34:40Jack LondonChapter 7


Short Mysteries (times relative to 5 PM)


Time
Artist
Title
00:00:00Arthur Conan Doyle01 The Adventure of the Musgrave Ritual
00:42:25Robert Louis Stevenson02 The Body-Snatcher
01:24:41Ellis Parker Butler03 The Chicken
01:52:41MIke DieselVoice 018 -- Staion ID
01:52:59Ernest Bramah04 The Coin of Dionysius
02:25:09Sir Arthur Conan Doyle05 The Field Bazaar
02:31:53Arthur Conan Doyle06 A Foreign Office Romance
02:52:10Mike DieselVoice 016 -- station ID
02:52:44Fergus Hume07 The Green-Stone God and the Stockbroker
03:30:01Sir Arthur Conan Doyle08 The Horror of the Heights
04:06:34Arlo Bates09 In the Virginia Room
04:34:49Mike DieselVoice 013 - station ID
04:35:17Sir Arthur Conan Doyle10 The Lost Special
05:14:37Edgar Allen Poe11 The Oblong Box
05:40:02Ellis Parker Butler12 The Oubliette
06:22:20J. K. Bangs13 A Quicksilver Cassandra
06:32:11Mike DieselVoice 011 -- Station ID
06:32:37Edgar Allan Poe14 Silence - A Fable
06:44:07Ellis Parker Butler15 The Two-Cent Stamp
07:19:11Ellis Parker Butler16 The Un-Burglars

--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

Eastern Panhandle Independent Community (EPIC) Radio: Poetry and Literature on Monday on EPIC Radio

Eastern Panhandle Independent Community (EPIC) Radio: Poetry and Literature on Monday on EPIC Radio: EPIC Radio --Monday, February 13, 2017 -- Highlights Here is our Player: Here is our call-in Line: 304-885-0708 ...

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Sunday, Feb 12, on EPIC Radio -- Philosophy, Religion, Bluegrass

Sunday, Feb 12, on EPIC Radio -- Philosophy, Religion, Bluegrass


Sunday Playlists for Religion and Philosophy. (After that Bluegrass all night! until the poetry show Monday!)




Here is our player



 






Philosophy follows three programs from This American Life

Beginning: 8:00 AM EST -- times below are relative to 8:00 AM



Time
Artist
Title
00:00:00This American Life#609: It's Working Out Very Nicely
01:03:07Mike DieselVoice 008 -- station ID
01:03:24This American Life#608: The Revolution Starts At Noon
02:11:18MIke DieselVoice 010 -- Station ID
02:11:27This American Life#607: Didn't We Solve This One?





Quaker Radio


Times relative to approximately  11:10 AM

Quaker Radio features Liberation Theology Lectures, Pope Francis, and  a reprise of the classic 1960 Harvard Divinity Lecture of Paul Tillich.



Time
Artist
Title
00:00:00Betsy CazdenSlave rebellions and Quaker anxiety in the turn against slavery
00:27:31Mike DieselVoice 011 -- Station ID
00:27:57Jane FremonReaching Out and Across
00:37:53Paul TillichPaulTillichAtHarvard 1.12.1960
01:45:10John J. O'Keefe and Wendy M. WrightPope Francis and "Integral Humanism"
02:05:42Jack KerouacSan Francisco Scene (The Beat Generation)
02:08:50Franciscan Mission ServiceLiberation Theology Podcast Pt 2
02:42:00Mike DieselVoice 014 -- Station ID
02:42:24Franciscan Mission ServiceFrancis and the Foolishness of God Pt. 1
03:22:26Franciscan Mission ServiceFrancis and the Foolishness of God Pt. 2

--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

Poets and Mechanics Quaker Meeting for Worship: Feb 12, 2017

Poets and Mechanics Meeting for Worship -- Feb 12, 2017

Friends: We meet for worship in the second floor reading room of the Four Seasons Bookstore, 114 German St, Shepherdstown, WV, 8:30 AM.

The bookstore is not open at 8:30, so, enter the "private entrance" gate immediately to the left of the store and walk back to the staircase. Enter the landing closest to the front of the store -- that's the EPIC Radio Studio. Go thru the kitchen into the reading room.

If you have a harmonious spirit, feeling or personal witness towards the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community,  equality and stewardship, and the Light of the Divine in each life, or simply a curiosity -- Welcome!


Some have asked "Why Poets and Mechanics"? It came to me in a dream, truly. But, on reflection, I don't think it leaves anyone out  whose feet seek the paths of the Testimonies of Light, and to be of use along the Ways.

A poem for reflection


The Light by the Barn by William Stafford


The light by the barn that shines all night
pales at dawn when a little breeze comes.

A little breeze comes breathing the fields
from their sleep and waking the slow windmill.

The slow windmill sings the long day
about anguish and loss to the chickens at work.

The little breeze follows the slow windmill
and the chickens at work till the sun goes down--

Then the light by the barn again.

--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

Poets and Mechanics Meeting for Worship -- Feb 12, 2017

Friends: We meet for worship in the second floor reading room of the Four Seasons Bookstore, 114 German St, Shepherdstown, WV, 8:30 AM.

The bookstore is not open at 8:30, so, enter the "private entrance" gate immediately to the left of the store and walk back to the staircase. Enter the landing closest to the front of the store -- that's the EPIC Radio Studio. Go thru the kitchen into the reading room.

If you have a harmonious spirit, feeling or personal witness towards the Quaker testimonies of simplicity, peace, integrity, community,  equality and stewardship, and the Light of the Divine in each life, or simply a curiosity -- Welcome!


Some have asked "Why Poets and Mechanics"? It came to me in a dream, truly. But, on reflection, I don't think it leaves anyone out  whose feet seek the paths of the Testimonies of Light, and to be of use along the Ways.

A poem for reflection


The Light by the Barn by William Stafford


The light by the barn that shines all night
pales at dawn when a little breeze comes.

A little breeze comes breathing the fields
from their sleep and waking the slow windmill.

The slow windmill sings the long day
about anguish and loss to the chickens at work.

The little breeze follows the slow windmill
and the chickens at work till the sun goes down--

Then the light by the barn again.


Monday, February 6, 2017

Great podcasts for the spirit

1. Fanny Crawford explores the themes of lost love in the African American folk tale tradition.

2. The poetry show on EPIC Radio features Dr Heidi Hanrahan of Shepherd University leading a VERY timely discussion of Walt Whitman's American vision.


peace

John

--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

EPIC Radio Podcasts: Storytelling with Fanny Crawford — Lost Loves — Fe...

EPIC Radio Podcasts: Storytelling with Fanny Crawford — Lost Loves — Fe...: Fanny Crawford spins some lost love tales from the African American folk tale tradition on EPIC Radio , Feb 6, 2017, Noon-1PM EST. Stew...

Fwd: Hosting the Homeless at SPC Week of 25 February 2017

via Shepherdstown Presbyterian


Hello Everybody,

Shepherdstown Presbyterian Church will again welcome out community's
homeless this from 2/25/2017 – 3/3/2017.  You are receiving this
communication because you have volunteered for this effort in the past or
because you have expressed interest.  We will be having an orientation,
(date to be determined) to discuss the guidelines for safety and security of
our volunteers and guests.  The orientation is primarily for those
interested in staying overnight, but anybody is welcome.

The number of people we serve has grown since we last hosted in December.
Recently, there have been between 11 and 17 people staying at the shelter.


There are three separate efforts:

        1) Morning meals – each morning we provide a breakfast for our
guests.  These range from a breakfast bar and a cup of coffee to a hot
breakfast including eggs and a sausage or bacon.  Helen Burns will again be
coordinating this effort.  If you would like to volunteer to    provide
breakfast, you can contact Helen Burns at helenburns@frontier.com.

        2) Bag Lunches – Each day, the Buddha Buddies will provide bag
lunches for our guests to have during the day.  Typically they are delivered
the night before and distributed when our guests leave in the morning.  If
you would like to help prepare or deliver the lunches, you may  contact Nan
Broadhurst at nanbroad@gmail.com.

        3) Overnight Volunteers – Each night we will need at least one man
and one woman to stay overnight with the guests.  The volunteers usually
arrive between 7:30 and 8:30.  Overnight volunteers typically help guests
get settled in and are on site all night in case anything unusual
happens.  I will coordinate the volunteers, if you would like to chaperone
overnight, please contact me at phodder@frontiernet.net or 240- 472-5721.

Here is what we can expect during the week:

1) Shelter manager and volunteers will arrive Saturday with cots, etc.. They
will be left in the nursery until the evening.
2) Guests will have dinner at different churches each night.
3) Van will arrive with Shelter Manager (John Cloyd) and guests each night
between 7:30 – 8:00 (Lately there have been between 4 – 5 overnight
guests).
4) Shelter manager will ensure church is in good order, and that any new
guests have filled out the necessary paper work.
5) Women will set up in the nursery, men in the fellowship hall
6) Buddha Buddies will drop off coolers with bag lunches for the following
day.
7) Helen will make sure breakfast supplies are available each night (for the
following morning).
8) Shelter manager will stay until everybody is settled in, overnight
volunteers can arrive anywhere between 7:30 and 8:30 as schedules permit
9) Many guests will be tired from the day and just want to lay down to
sleep.  A few may want to talk and get to know you.  I encourage anybody to
engage any guests who are receptive.
10) Last cigarette at 9:45
11) Lights out at 10:00; at least one volunteer should be awake throughout
the night.  Couches are available for volunteers upstairs or in the nursery
(women only).
13) I usually start coffee around 5:30, but guests will make their own if
need be.
14) Lights on at 6:00, get coffee, grab a bite to eat.
15) Clean bathrooms & floors before van departs at 7:00

Please note that if you want to participate, but will not be available this
week, there are many opportunities still open this winter.  You can contact
Jefferson Community Ministries at (304)725-3186

Kind Regards,
Paul








--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Poetry Monday on EPIC Radio

http://www.enlightenradio.org/2017/02/walt-whitman-joins-epic-radio-poetry.html


Walt Whitman Joins the Poetry Show --Feb 6, 2017, Storytelling and Sherlock later

EPIC Radio -- Monday, Feb 6, 2016 Lineup

Dr. Heidi Hanrahan, professor of English at Shepherd University talks about and through Walt Whitman on the Poetry Show.

7:30 - 9:00 AM, Monday, on EPIC Radio
--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Meeting for Worship, 8:30 AM, Feb 5, Second Floor, Four SEasons Bookstore

Meeting for Worship, 8:30 AM, Feb 5, Second Floor, Four SEasons Bookstore

The Poets and Mechanics Meeting for Worship

8:30 AM

Feb 5, 2017

Second Floor reading room of the Four Seasons Bookstore, 114 German St in Shepherdstown, WV. The store is closed at 8:30, so please enter through the "private entrance" to the left of the store, and take the stairway halfway down the alley to the second floor toward the font of the building -- Enter the EPIC Radio Studio, go through the kitchen and into the upstairs bookstore.

A Reflection for Meeting:

Famous
BY NAOMI SHIHAB NYE
The river is famous to the fish.


The loud voice is famous to silence,   
which knew it would inherit the earth   
before anybody said so.   


The cat sleeping on the fence is famous to the birds   
watching him from the birdhouse.   


The tear is famous, briefly, to the cheek.   


The idea you carry close to your bosom   
is famous to your bosom.   


The boot is famous to the earth,   
more famous than the dress shoe,   
which is famous only to floors.


The bent photograph is famous to the one who carries it   
and not at all famous to the one who is pictured.   


I want to be famous to shuffling men   
who smile while crossing streets,   
sticky children in grocery lines,   
famous as the one who smiled back.


I want to be famous in the way a pulley is famous,   
or a buttonhole, not because it did anything spectacular,   

but because it never forgot what it could do.

--
John Case
Harpers Ferry, WV

The Winners and Losers Radio Show
7-9 AM Weekdays, The EPIC Radio Player Stream, 
Sign UP HERE to get the Weekly Program Notes.

Meeting for Worship, 8:30 AM, Feb 5, Second Floor, Four SEasons Bookstore

The Poets and Mechanics Meeting for Worship

8:30 AM

Feb 5, 2017

Second Floor reading room of the Four Seasons Bookstore, 114 German St in Shepherdstown, WV. The store is closed at 8:30, so please enter through the "private entrance" to the left of the store, and take the stairway halfway down the alley to the second floor toward the font of the building -- Enter the EPIC Radio Studio, go through the kitchen and into the upstairs bookstore.

A Reflection for Meeting:

Famous
BY NAOMI SHIHAB NYE
The river is famous to the fish.


The loud voice is famous to silence,   
which knew it would inherit the earth   
before anybody said so.   


The cat sleeping on the fence is famous to the birds   
watching him from the birdhouse.   


The tear is famous, briefly, to the cheek.   


The idea you carry close to your bosom   
is famous to your bosom.   


The boot is famous to the earth,   
more famous than the dress shoe,   
which is famous only to floors.


The bent photograph is famous to the one who carries it   
and not at all famous to the one who is pictured.   


I want to be famous to shuffling men   
who smile while crossing streets,   
sticky children in grocery lines,   
famous as the one who smiled back.


I want to be famous in the way a pulley is famous,   
or a buttonhole, not because it did anything spectacular,   

but because it never forgot what it could do.